Molecular analysis of gibberellin receptor gene GID1 in Dasypyrum villosum and development of DNA marker for its identification

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  • Authors: Razumova O.V.1,2, Bazhenov M.S.1, Nikitina E.A.1, Nazarova L.A.1, Romanov D.V.1, Chernook A.G.1, Sokolov P.A.3, Kuznetsova V.M.1, Semenov O.G.4, Karlov G.I.1,3, Kharchenko P.N.1, Divashuk M.G.1,3
  • Affiliations:
    1. All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology
    2. Moscow Botanical Garden of Academy of Sciences
    3. Russian State Agrarian University - Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy
    4. Рeoples’ Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University)
  • Issue: Vol 15, No 1 (2020)
  • Pages: 62-85
  • Section: Genetics and plant breeding
  • URL: http://agrojournal.rudn.ru/agronomy/article/view/19544
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.22363/2312-797X-2020-15-1-62-85
  • Cite item

Abstract


Dasypyrum villosum is an annual cereal used as a donor of agronomic traits for wheat. Productivity is one of the most important traits that breeding is aimed at. It is a very complex trait, the formation of which is influenced by many different factors, both internal (the genotype of the plant) and external. The genes responsible for the gibberellin sensitivity played a large role in multiplying yields of cereal crops. Another such gene is the Gid1, which encodes a receptor for gibberellins. This article compares the DNA sequences of the Gid1 gene obtained from six Dasypyrum villosum samples. Using a sequence of wheat and rye taken from the GenBank database (NCBI), we selected primers for regions of different genomes (A, B, and D subgenomes of wheat and the R genome of rye), and carried out a polymerase chain reaction on D. villosum accessions of diverse geographical origin. The resulting PCR product was sequenced by an NGS method. Based on the assembled sequences, DNA markers have been created that make it possible to differentiate these genes of the V genome and homologous genes of wheat origin. Using monosomic addition, substitution, and translocation wheat lines, the localization of the Gid1 gene of D. villosum was established on the long arm of the first V chromosome. A phenotypic assessment of common wheat lines carrying substituted, translocated, or added D. villosum chromosomes in their karyotype was performed. Tendency of disappearance of the first chromosome of D. villosum in the lines with added chromosomes was revealed.


About the authors

Olga Vladimirovna Razumova

All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology; Moscow Botanical Garden of Academy of Sciences

Author for correspondence.
Email: razumovao@gmail.com
Moscow, Russian Federation

Candidate of Biological Sciences, Senior Researcher, Laboratory of Applied Genomics and Private Breeding of Agricultural Plants

Mikhail Sergeevich Bazhenov

All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology

Email: mikhabazhenov@gmail.com
Moscow, Russian Federation

Candidate of Biological Sciences, senior researcher, Laboratory of Applied Genomics and Private Breeding of Agricultural Plants

Ekaterina Aleksandrovna Nikitina

All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology

Email: shhket@gmail.com
Moscow, Russian Federation

Laboratory Assistant, Laboratory of Applied Genomics and Private Breeding of Agricultural Plants

Lyubov Andreevna Nazarova

All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology

Email: lpukhova@yandex.ru
Moscow, Russian Federation

Junior Researcher, Laboratory of Applied Genomics and Private Breeding of Agricultural Plants

Dmitry Viktorovich Romanov

All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology

Email: akabos1987@gmail.com
Moscow, Russian Federation

Candidate of Biological Sciences, senior researcher, Laboratory of Applied Genomics and Private Breeding of Agricultural Plants

Anastasiya Gennadievna Chernook

All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology

Email: Irbis-sibrI@yandex.ru
Moscow, Russian Federation

Junior Researcher, Laboratory of Applied Genomics and Private Breeding of Agricultural Plants

Pavel Andreevich Sokolov

Russian State Agrarian University - Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy

Email: pav2395147@yandex.ru
Moscow, Russian Federation

Laboratory Assistant Researcher, Center for Molecular Biotechnology

Viktoria Maksimovna Kuznetsova

All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology

Email: vika-kuz367@yandex.ru
Moscow, Russian Federation

Junior Researcher, Laboratory of Applied Genomics and Private Breeding of Agricultural Plants

Oleg Grigorievich Semenov

Рeoples’ Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University)

Email: semenov_og@rudn.university
Moscow, Russian Federation

Candidate of Biological Sciences, professor, Technosphere Safety Department, Agrarian-technological Institute

Gennady Ilyich Karlov

All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology; Russian State Agrarian University - Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy

Email: karlovg@gmail.com
Moscow, Russian Federation

Doctor of Biological Sciences, Professor, Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Director

Petr Nikolaevich Kharchenko

All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology

Email: iab@iab.ru
Moscow, Russian Federation

Doctor of Biological Sciences, Professor, Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Scientific Advisor

Mikhail Georgievich Divashuk

All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology; Russian State Agrarian University - Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy

Email: divashuk@gmail.com
Moscow, Russian Federation

Candidate of Biological Sciences, leading researcher, Laboratory of Applied Genomics and Private Breeding of Agricultural Plants

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Copyright (c) 2020 Razumova O.V., Bazhenov M.S., Nikitina E.A., Nazarova L.A., Romanov D.V., Chernook A.G., Sokolov P.A., Kuznetsova V.M., Semenov O.G., Karlov G.I., Kharchenko P.N., Divashuk M.G.

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